Fall Courses

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Fall 2017

ISF Courses

ISF 10 Enduring Questions and Great Books of the Western Tradition
  • TuTh 9:30-11AM
  • Bhandari
  • Evans 9
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 22711

This course is a broad survey of major canonical works (“Great Books”) emphasizing the Premodern traditions of Western Civilization since the Greeks. These texts offer responses to central questions that, across the disciplinary divides, continue to inform contemporary work in the social sciences and the humanities.  Indeed, the “disciplines” or departments as we know them on campus are of relatively recent invention, compared to the millennia of treatises, poetry, plays, literature, sacred writings, histories and philosophical inquiries that sought answers to the questions later asked by the disciplines themselves in the humanities and social sciences.  

This course is not a history of the disciplines, nor is it an attempt to find precursive texts for each discipline  -- we do not seek to construct disciplinary canons or genealogies.  Instead, it is an account of the enduring questions of western civilization that later found homes in the disciplines, but whose origins lie in a “pre-disciplinary” world.  While we choose the framework of the disciplines to present these texts, and to ask recurring questions that can today be found in separate disciplines, we seek to problematize the history of disciplinary knowledge.  In this course, we investigate how contemporary concerns about modern social problems have a deep, but also an interdisciplinary, history. 

ISF 100 A Introduction to Social Theory and Cultural Analysis
  • TuTh 12:30-2PM
  • Bhandari
  • North Gate 105
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 15445
Sect. 101
Class # 15446
Mondays 3-4PM
54 Barrows
Instructor: TBA

Section 102
Mondays 10-11
105 Dwinelle

Sect. 103
Class #15447
Tuesdays, 9-10AM
Wheeler 30
Instructor: TBA

Sect. 104
Class # 15448
Tuesdays 3-4PM
Location: Dwinelle 106
Instructor: TBA


This course, required of all ISF majors but open to all students, provides an introduction to the works of foundational social theorists of the nineteenth century, including Karl Marx and Max Weber. Writing in what might be called the “pre disciplinary” period of the modern social sciences, their works cross the boundaries of anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, and are today claimed by these and other disciplines as essential texts. We will read intensively and critically from their respective works, situating their intellectual contributions in the history of social transformations wrought by industrialization and urbanization, political revolution, and the development of modern consumer society. 

ISF 100 H Introduction to Media and International Relations
  • Mondays 3-6PM
  • Wren
  • Mulford 240
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45995

How have international actors used media to construct public opinion about salient issues, such as war, terrorism and intervention, international trade and finance, and global warming and resource depletion? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to key concepts, methods, and theories in the analysis of media effects, particularly in the areas of public opinion formation and international relations.

ISF 100 J The Social Life of Computing
  • TuTh 2-3:30PM
  • Kelkar
  • Wurster 102
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 46016

The time we live in is often called the “information age” or the age of computing. Some analysts have likened it to a third Industrial Revolution: the first one happened in the 18th century in England and involved the use of water and steam power in the manufacture of textiles; the second happened in the 19th century United States and involved the rise of the railways, electricity grids and the managerial corporation; the third Revolution is ostensibly happening through the increasing development and use of computer networks. In this class, we will look at computing as a “social” phenomenon: to see it not just as a technology that transforms but to see it as a technology that has evolved, and is being put to use, in very particular ways, by particular groups of people. We will be doing this by employing a variety of methods, primarily historical and ethnographic, oriented around a study of practices. We will pay attention to technical details but ground these technical details in social organization (a term whose meaning should become clearer and clearer as the class progresses). We will study the social organization of computing around different kinds of hardware, software, ideologies, and ideas.

ISF 110 Special Topics
  • TuTh 10-12
  • Quamruzzaman
  • Haviland 214
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 67128

This will be a hands-on workshop. The course will open with Professor Quamruzzaman walking students through the research process behind some of his publications which include both pieces in the leading sociology of health journals in the world and his own book on politics in Bangladesh.

Professor Quamruzzaman will then guide you in collecting your own data for a research project and teach you how to analyze and present it.

ISF will allow you to include this course (ISF 110, Fall 2017) as either one of the six courses in your research program or as one of the theory and practice courses (ISF 100B-J).

The course will be an excellent supplement to ISF 189 or ISF 190, and is highly recommended for all current and intended ISF students. A few spots will be reserved for non-ISF majors. But slots will be limited to make sure the course can operate as a workshop.

 

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MWF 10-11
  • Xu
  • Evans 2
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 16191

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises.  The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences.   At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • MWF 12-1PM
  • TBA
  • Evans 2
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 16192

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises. The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences. At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

ISF 189 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods
  • TuTh 9:30-11AM
  • Kelkar
  • Evans 4
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 44227

This class is an introduction to research methods, leading students through different units built around specific learning goals and practical exercises. The course is designed to teach a range of research skills, including (but not limited to) the ability to formulate research questions and to engage in scholarly conversations and arguments; the identification, evaluation, mobilization, and interpretation of sources; methods and instruments of field research (interviews, questionnaires, and sampling) and statistical thinking; and the construction of viable arguments and explanation in the human sciences. At the same time, the course is designed to help students identify their own thesis topic, bibliography, and methodological orientation in preparation for ISF 190.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 3-4PM
  • Xu
  • Evans 6
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 16196

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF Major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor.  The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their Course of Study.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • TuTh 4-5PM
  • Kelkar
  • Evans 2
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 16206

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF Major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor.  The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their Course of Study.

ISF 190 Senior Thesis
  • MW 1-2
  • Wren
  • Evans 2
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 44226

The ISF Senior Thesis requirement is the capstone experience and final product of the ISF Major. The thesis is a sustained, original, and critical examination of a central interdisciplinary research question, developed under the guidance of the ISF 190 instructor.  The thesis represents a mature synthesis of research skills, critical thinking, and competent writing. As the final product of a student's work in the major, the thesis is not the place to explore a new set of disciplines or research problems for the first time, but should develop methods of inquiry and bridge the several disciplines that students have developed in their Course of Study.

Approved Theory and Practice courses
Note: students who enroll in one of these courses cannot count the course as part of their Upper Division Course of Study Requirement.

Anthropology 115 Medical Anthropology
  • MWF 12-1PM
  • Scheper-Hughes
  • Barrows 166
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 21991

Cultural, psychological, and biological aspects of the definitions, causes, symptoms, and treatment of illness. Comparative study of medical systems, practitioners, and patients.

Anthropology 141 Comparative Society
  • TuTh 2-3:30PM
  • Ong
  • Kroeber 155
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 45168

Theories of social structure, functional interrelationships of social institutions. Primary emphasis on non-Western societies.

City and Regional Planning 119 Planning for Sustainability
  • TuTh 9:30-11AM
  • Acey
  • 112 Wurster
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 12049

This course examines how the concept of sustainable development applies to cities and urban regions and gives students insight into a variety of contemporary urban planning issues through the sustainability lens. The course combines lectures, discussions, student projects, and guest appearances by leading practitioners in Bay Area sustainability efforts. Ways to coordinate goals of environment, economy, and equity at different scales of planning are addressed, including the region, the city, the neighborhood, and the site.

Comparative Literature 100 Introduction to Comparative Literature
  • TuTh 2-3:30PM
  • Britto
  • Dwinelle 258
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 21917

In the age of Facebook and Instagram, of tweets and vlogs, it can be difficult to remember that not so long ago the practice of narrating the self was often closely tied to intimate, private, and even secret forms of writing. In this course, we will consider a number of literary texts that experiment with such forms of writing, focusing in particular on the genre of the diary novel. Whether these texts present themselves as diaries, trouble the lines between diaries and related forms of intimate writing, or simply tell stories in which diaries figure prominently, they all explore the relationship between writing and subjectivity. Reading comparatively, we will try to understand why authors from different historical, cultural, and geographic locations have turned to fictional diaries to explore the interplay between identity and difference, subjugation and freedom, and private and public selves.

Economics 131 Public Economics
  • MW 5-6:30
  • Auerbach
  • Hearst Mining 390
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 13825

This course focuses on the role of the government in the economy from a theoretical and empirical perspective. The aim of the course is to provide an understanding of the reasons for government intervention in the economy, analyzing the merits of possible government policies, and the response of economic agents to the government's actions. The course covers the analysis of tax policy, social insurance programs, public goods, environmental protection, and the interaction between different levels of government. Special emphasis is set on current government policy issues such as social security reform, income tax reform, and budget deficits.

Education 140 AC The Art of Making Meaning: Educational Perspectives on Literacy and Learning in a Global World
  • TuTh 9:30-11AM
  • Hull
  • Genetics and Plant Biology 107
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 40027

This course combines theory and practice in the study of literacy and development. It will introduce sociocultural educational theory and research focused especially on literacy teaching and learning, and this literature will be examined in practice through participation in computer-based after-school programs. In addition, the course will contribute to understanding of race, culture, and ethnicity in the United States. We will develop a view of literacy, not as a neutral skill, but as embedded within culture and as depending for its meaning and its practice upon social institutions and conditions.

Energy and Resources Group C 100 Energy and Society
  • TuTh 3:30-5
  • Kammen
  • Hearst Field Annex A1
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 23288

In this course, you will develop an understanding—and a technically and socially deep working knowledge—of our energy technologies, policies, and options.  This will include analysis of the different opportunities and impacts of energy systems that exist within and between groups defined by national, regional, household, ethnic, and gender distinctions.  Analysis of the range of current and future energy choices will be stressed, as well as the role of energy in determining local environmental conditions and the global climate.

Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 161 Environmental Philosophy and Ethics
  • MW 4-5
  • Merchant
  • Mulford 159
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 23456

A critical analysis of human environments as physical, social-economic, and technocultural ecosystems with emphasis on the role of ideologies, beliefs, attitudes, and behavior. An examination of contemporary environmental literature and the philosophies embodied therein.

Legal Studies 145 Law and Economics
  • TuTh 9:30-11AM
  • TBA
  • Lewis 9
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 46258

The course will apply microeconomic theory analysis to legal rules and procedures. Emphasis will be given to the economic consequences of various sorts of liability rules, remedies for breach of contract and the allocation of property rights. The jurisprudential significance of the analysis will be discussed.

Letters and Science 126 Energy and Civilization
  • TuTh 11-12:30
  • Rosen
  • TBA
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 44483

Energy is one of the main drivers of civilization. Today we are at the precipice of what many hope will be a major paradigm shift in energy production and use. Two transitions are needed. On the one hand, we must find ways to extend the benefits of our existing energy system to the impoverished people living in the developing world while continuing to provide these benefits to the people of the developed world. On the other hand, we must completely overhaul the existing system to fight climate change and other forms of air and water pollution. Are these shifts truly within our reach? Can we achieve both simultaneously? If so, how? This Big Ideas course will grapple with these questions using an interdisciplinary systems approach.

Psychology C 162 Human Happiness
  • TuTh 7-8PM
  • Keltner
  • VLSB 2050
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 44697

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to an understanding of happiness. The first part of the course will be devoted to the different treatments of happiness in the world's philosophical traditions, focusing up close on conceptions or the good life in classical Greek and Judeo-Christian thought, the great traditions in East Asian thought (Taoism, Buddhism, Confucianism), and ideas about happiness that emerged more recently in the age of Enlightenment. With these different perspectives as a framework, the course will then turn to treatments of happiness in the behavioral sciences, evolutionary scholarship, and neuroscience. Special emphasis will be given to understanding how happiness arises in experiences of the moral emotions, including gratitude, compassion, reverence and awe, as well as aesthetic emotions like humor and beauty.

Psychology 168 Topical Seminars in Social Psychology
  • M 1-3PM
  • Steele
  • TBA
  • 3 Units
  • Class Number: 46257

CONTACT PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT FOR COURSE DETAILS.

Rhetoric 114 Rhetoric of New Media
  • TuTh 11-12:30
  • TBA
  • Moffitt Library 340
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 20335

This course examines a range of digital media practices including hypertext, interactive drama, videogames, literary interactive fiction, and socially constructed narratives in multi-user spaces. Through a mixture of readings, discussion, and project work, we will explore the theoretical positions, debates, and design issues arising from these different practices. Topics will include the rhetorical, ludic, theatrical, narrative political, and legal dimensions of digital media.

Sociology 140 Politics and Social Change
  • TuTh 12:30-2PM
  • Tugal
  • Kroeber 160
  • 4 Units
  • Class Number: 20772

This survey course studies the relationship between society and politics through an analysis of the intersection of economic development, social relations, and the political sphere. Examines how class, race, ethnicity, and gender interact with political culture, ideology, and the state. The course also looks at diverse forms of political behavior, a key aspect of politics.